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Monday Money – The 70’s Brit style

 

Nowadays Triumph cars are pretty appealing to my eyes. They had a bad reputation for a few years due to rust and unreliability issues, but a well sought after or restored model is a thrill to drive and to look at.
The TR6 came out in 1968 and went into production until 1976 selling over 90,000 units. It was at the time the best-seller of the Triumph range, and I have reasons to believe that it might be thanks to the 2.5L straight 6 unit. The punchy little straight 6 produces 150hp which is a pretty good figure for the time, and even for today considering it is only 1,100kg on the balance.
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To be noted, a limited slip differential was available as an option, but few models have actually been fitted with it and with was the same with the very rare factory hard-top.
The car is not the fastest or the prettiest for some enthusiasts but is to my eyes very appealing and nice to look at with a proper 70’s British look. There are generally two schools with MG fans on one side and Triumph on the other. Both brands offered similar cars with many similar features but a very different personality and design. I do love MG-B’s, but personally, my heart goes to Triumph.
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In terms of prices, the TR6 model will start around £10K for a project car. Be mindful as they are incredibly prone to rust, and engines with low maintenance over a few years can become tricky to restore. A decent one could be acquired for around £15K. It won’t be in mint condition but will be a fully derivable model that you can enjoy when the sun gets out. From £20K and upwards, you will get a restored or well maintained original model that you will just need to enjoy and care about. Best to get one before the few sunny days arrive…

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